MIRRORHOUSE

a compendium of literary artifacts, both actual and fraudulent
itwasthebestoflines:

“To the Lighthouse" by Virginia Woolf (1927).

itwasthebestoflines:

To the Lighthouseby Virginia Woolf (1927).

(via booklover)

awesomepeoplereading:

Mork reads about another of Earth’s adopted sons.

awesomepeoplereading:

Mork reads about another of Earth’s adopted sons.

"The Writers’ Retreat" by Grant Snider via The New York Times, July 17, 2014.

"The Writers’ Retreat" by Grant Snider via The New York Times, July 17, 2014.

nyrbclassics:

Nathan Gelgud writes (and draws) about Céléste Albaret’s memoir of her employer, Marcel Proust, in Biographile:

For this reader, [Albaret’s] great achievement is this warm memoir of an unusual friendship between a seemingly average woman and an eccentric genius.

nyrbclassics:

Nathan Gelgud writes (and draws) about Céléste Albaret’s memoir of her employer, Marcel Proust, in Biographile:

For this reader, [Albaret’s] great achievement is this warm memoir of an unusual friendship between a seemingly average woman and an eccentric genius.

(Source: biographile.com, via powells)

You’re afraid of imagination. And even more afraid of dreams. Afraid of the responsibility that begins in dreams. But you have to sleep, and dreams are a part of sleep. When you’re awake you can suppress imagination. But you can’t suppress dreams.

Haruki Murakami, Kafka On The Shore (via goddamnimglam)

"Temple of the Holy Ghost" by Bernard Cooper, from MAPS TO ANYWHERE

"The Moon In Its Flight" by Gilbert Sorrentino, recommended by Jenny Offill

recommendedreading:


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Issue No. 115

EDITOR’S NOTE


It’s hard to write about “The Moon In Its Flight” because it means too much to me. I have read it more often than any other story and have taught it every year for twenty years.

The first time I came across it was in a library in New Orleans. I was killing time in the air-conditioned stacks before I went to my waitressing job that night. I worked in a Turkish restaurant where I was required to dress up like a genie and read fortunes out of coffee grounds. I was twenty. Twenty-one maybe. It doesn’t matter really. Impossibly young, let’s say.

When I finished it, I just sat there, thinking, Holy shit, holy shit, holy shit. “The Moon in Its Flight” is a funny story and because of this I’d been skating across the top of it, but when I got to a certain point it was like falling through the ice into freezing water. I felt like I’d been given a glimpse of what it would be like to be twenty years older once life had hammered the hell out of me.

I had never read a story that contained so much emotion in so little space. It swings from the most stunningly cynical moments to the most unnervingly tender, often within the space of one paragraph. And like all geniuses, Sorrentino makes it look easy. I will never write something as good as this story, but I like rereading it, seeing again how high he set the bar. Believe me when I say I wanted to kiss his shoe.

I’m tempted to quote line after line from the story here, but I don’t need to because you can just read it for yourself. If you like it, you should go seek out the rest of his work.

If you don’t like it, wait twenty years and read it again.


Jenny Offill
Author of Dept. of Speculation



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Support Recommended Reading


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The Moon In Its Flight

by Gilbert Sorrentino

Recommended by Jenny Offill

Get Kindle Get ePub


This was in 1948. A group of young people sitting on the darkened porch of a New Jersey summer cottage in a lake resort community. The host some Bernie wearing an Upsala College sweatshirt. The late June night so soft one can, in retrospect, forgive America for everything. There were perhaps eight or nine people there, two of them the people that this story sketches.

Bernie was talking about Sonny Stitt’s alto on “That’s Earl, Brother.” As good as Bird, he said. Arnie said, bullshit: he was a very hip young man from Washington Heights, wore mirrored sunglasses. A bop drummer in his senior year at the High School of Performing Arts. Our young man, nineteen at this time, listened only to Rebecca, a girl of fifteen, remarkable in her New Look clothes. A long full skirt, black, snug tailored shirt of blue and white stripes with a high white collar and black velvet string tie, black kid Capezios. It is no wonder that lesbians like women.

At some point during the evening he walked Rebecca home. She lived on Lake Shore Drive, a wide road that skirted the beach and ran parallel to the small river that flowed into Lake Minnehaha. Lake Ramapo? Lake Tomahawk. Lake O-shi-wa-noh? Lake Sunburst. Leaning against her father’s powder-blue Buick convertible, lost, in the indigo night, the creamy stars, sound of crickets, they kissed. They fell in love.

One of the songs that summer was “For Heaven’s Sake.” Another, “It’s Magic.” Who remembers the clarity of Claude Thornhill and Sarah Vaughan, their exquisite irrelevance? They are gone where the useless chrome doughnuts on the Buick’s hood have gone. That Valhalla of Amos ’n’ Andy and guinea fruit peddlers with golden earrings. “Pleasa No Squeeza Da Banana.” In 1948, the whole world seemed beautiful to young people of a certain milieu, or let me say, possible. Yes, it seemed a possible world. This idea persisted until 1950, at which time it died, along with many of the young people who had held it. In Korea, the Chinese played “Scrapple from the Apple” over loudspeakers pointed at the American lines. That savage and virile alto blue-clear on the subzero night. This is, of course, old news.

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theparisreview:

A page from Joy Williams’s The Quick and the Dead. “The story knows itself better than the writer does at some point, knows what’s being said before the writer figures out how to say it.”

Joy Williams is the World’s Greatest Living Writer.

theparisreview:

A page from Joy Williams’s The Quick and the Dead. “The story knows itself better than the writer does at some point, knows what’s being said before the writer figures out how to say it.”

Joy Williams is the World’s Greatest Living Writer.

Bliss—a-second-by-second joy and gratitude at the gift of being alive, conscious—lies on the other side of crushing, crushing boredom. Pay close attention to the most tedious thing you can find (Tax Returns, Televised Golf) and, in waves, a boredom like you’ve never known will wash over you and just about kill you. Ride these out, and it’s like stepping from black and white into color. Like water after days in the desert. Instant bliss in every atom.

David Foster Wallace, The Pale King (via booksalon)

dbvictoria:

A truly unique work of fiction, ‘The Codex Seraphinianus‘ is a book that appears to be a visual encyclopedia of some unknown world or dimension. Written down in one of that worlds beautiful curving languages, the book by Italian artist, architect and industrial designer Luigi Serafini, explains the odd inhabitants and their colorful behaviors.

(x)

(via fevereddream)

wavingtovirginia:

Virginia Woolf, Vita Sackville-West and two dogs sitting on a grass bank. Monk’s House (Rodmell, England), 1933.

I try to invent you for myself, but find I really have only 2 twigs and 3 straws to do it with. I can get the sensation of seeing you—hair, lips, colour, height, even, now and then, the eyes and hands, but I find you going off, to walk in the garden, to play tennis, to dig, to sit smoking and talking, and then I cant invent a thing you say—This proves, what I could write reams about—how little we know anyone, only movements and gestures, nothing connected, continuous, profound. But give me a hint I implore.”

— Virginia Woolf in a letter to Vita Sackville-West

(via booklover)

Book-Cut Artworks by Thomas Allen

via fer1972

(via vintagecrimeblacklizard)