MIRRORHOUSE

a compendium of literary artifacts, both actual and fraudulent
from "Coyote vs. Acme" by Ian Frazier:
Mr. Coyote states that on occasions too numerous to list in this document he has suffered mishaps with explosives purchased of Defendant: the Acme “Little Giant” Firecracker, the Acme Self-Guided Aerial Bomb, etc. (For a full listing, see the Acme Mail Order Explosives Catalogue and attached deposition, entered in evidence as Exhibit C.) Indeed, it is safe to say that not once has an explosive purchased of Defendant by Mr. Coyote performed in an expected manner. To cite just one example: At the expense of much time and personal effort, Mr. Coyote constructed around the outer rim of a butte a wooden trough beginning at the top of the butte and spiraling downward around it to some few feet above a black X painted on the desert floor. The trough was designed in such a way that a spherical explosive of the type sold by Defendant would roll easily and swiftly down to the point of detonation indicated by the X. Mr. Coyote placed a generous pile of birdseed directly on the X, and then, carrying the spherical Acme Bomb (Catalogue #78-832), climbed to the top of the butte. Mr. Coyote’s prey, seeing the birdseed, approached, and Mr. Coyote proceeded to light the fuse. In an instant, the fuse burned down to the stem, causing the Bomb to detonate. In addition to reducing all Mr. Coyote’s careful preparations to naught, the premature detonation of Defendant’s product resulted in the following disfigurements to Mr. Coyote:
1. Severe singeing of the hair on the head, neck, and muzzle. 2. Sooty discoloration. 3. Fracture of the left ear at the stem, causing the ear to dangle in the aftershock with a creaking noise. 4. Full or partial combustion of whiskers, producing kinking, frazzling, and ashy disintegration. 5. Radical widening of the eyes, due to brow and lid charring.

from "Coyote vs. Acme" by Ian Frazier:

Mr. Coyote states that on occasions too numerous to list in this document he has suffered mishaps with explosives purchased of Defendant: the Acme “Little Giant” Firecracker, the Acme Self-Guided Aerial Bomb, etc. (For a full listing, see the Acme Mail Order Explosives Catalogue and attached deposition, entered in evidence as Exhibit C.) Indeed, it is safe to say that not once has an explosive purchased of Defendant by Mr. Coyote performed in an expected manner. To cite just one example: At the expense of much time and personal effort, Mr. Coyote constructed around the outer rim of a butte a wooden trough beginning at the top of the butte and spiraling downward around it to some few feet above a black X painted on the desert floor. The trough was designed in such a way that a spherical explosive of the type sold by Defendant would roll easily and swiftly down to the point of detonation indicated by the X. Mr. Coyote placed a generous pile of birdseed directly on the X, and then, carrying the spherical Acme Bomb (Catalogue #78-832), climbed to the top of the butte. Mr. Coyote’s prey, seeing the birdseed, approached, and Mr. Coyote proceeded to light the fuse. In an instant, the fuse burned down to the stem, causing the Bomb to detonate. In addition to reducing all Mr. Coyote’s careful preparations to naught, the premature detonation of Defendant’s product resulted in the following disfigurements to Mr. Coyote:

1. Severe singeing of the hair on the head, neck, and muzzle.
2. Sooty discoloration.
3. Fracture of the left ear at the stem, causing the ear to dangle in the aftershock with a creaking noise.
4. Full or partial combustion of whiskers, producing kinking, frazzling, and ashy disintegration.
5. Radical widening of the eyes, due to brow and lid charring.

Ben Lerner’s 10:04

Ben Lerner’s 10:04

The saddest Far Side-like New Yorker cartoon ever.

The saddest Far Side-like New Yorker cartoon ever.

We need the humanities not because they will produce shrewder entrepreneurs or kinder C.E.O.s but because, as that first professor said, they help us enjoy life more and endure it better. The reason we need the humanities is because we’re human. That’s enough.

Why teach English?, by Adam Gopnik (via iphigenias)

(Source: newyorker.com, via iphigenias)

Every writer, of every political flavor, has some neat historical analogy, or mini-lesson, with which to preface an argument for why we ought to bomb these guys or side with those guys against the guys we were bombing before. But the best argument for reading history is not that it will show us the right thing to do in one case or the other, but rather that it will show us why even doing the right thing rarely works out.

Adam Gopnik on the value of studying history. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

Good and great causes don’t advance without resistance. First the thing is impossible, then improbable, then unsatisfactorily achieved, then quietly improved, until one day it is actual and uncontroversial. So it was with putting military weapons into the hands of openly homosexual soldiers, and so it shall be with taking military weapons out of the hands of crazy people. It starts off impossible and it ends up done.

Adam Gopnik on Obama’s stance against gun violence  (via newyorker)

itwasthebestoflines:

“To the Lighthouse" by Virginia Woolf (1927).

itwasthebestoflines:

To the Lighthouseby Virginia Woolf (1927).

(via booklover)

awesomepeoplereading:

Mork reads about another of Earth’s adopted sons.

awesomepeoplereading:

Mork reads about another of Earth’s adopted sons.

"The Writers’ Retreat" by Grant Snider via The New York Times, July 17, 2014.

"The Writers’ Retreat" by Grant Snider via The New York Times, July 17, 2014.

nyrbclassics:

Nathan Gelgud writes (and draws) about Céléste Albaret’s memoir of her employer, Marcel Proust, in Biographile:

For this reader, [Albaret’s] great achievement is this warm memoir of an unusual friendship between a seemingly average woman and an eccentric genius.

nyrbclassics:

Nathan Gelgud writes (and draws) about Céléste Albaret’s memoir of her employer, Marcel Proust, in Biographile:

For this reader, [Albaret’s] great achievement is this warm memoir of an unusual friendship between a seemingly average woman and an eccentric genius.

(Source: biographile.com, via powells)

You’re afraid of imagination. And even more afraid of dreams. Afraid of the responsibility that begins in dreams. But you have to sleep, and dreams are a part of sleep. When you’re awake you can suppress imagination. But you can’t suppress dreams.

Haruki Murakami, Kafka On The Shore (via goddamnimglam)